History

 
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Battery C 158th Field Artillery Regiment Perry, Oklahoma

The modern militia or “National Guard”, as we know it today, is a product of the Constitution of the United States of America. The constitutional basis for the modern militia system is found in Article I, Section 8. , clause 15 & 16 which and the Second Amendment. Today’s modern National Guard is governed, in part, by federal statute and has steadily evolved into a modern system of almost complete federal regulation and control. The state of Oklahoma has a militia and we know it as the “National Guard”. The state’s militia is a part of the executive department of the Oklahoma and may be used for police augmentation, civil disturbance control, natural disaster relief, or any other lawful purpose pertaining to security of the state and its citizens. The governor is the commander-in-chief of the militia and is generally responsible for its operations.

The United States also has a militia, and the federal militia is composed of the militia of the fifty states when properly called into active federal service during times of war or national emergency. The militia is an institution older than our Constitution, created by English common law for its colonies. Prior to the Revolutionary War, each colony had a militia whose main purpose was to protect the colonists from Indian raids, threats, and keep the peace. When the War of Independence started, these militia or minutemen defected to create the Continental Army but once independence was won, the Continental Army was disbanded. A few states maintained a militia to act as an independent military force. The First Congress, recognized the need for the establishment of a standing army and passed the Act of 1789 which gave birth to the U. S. Army. The Act of 1789 authorized the President to draft militia and fill the federal ranks. Units ranging from single companies to entire regiments were employed into federal service from the War of 1812 through the Spanish-American War in 1898.

This system remained undisturbed until 1903. At the turn of the twentieth century the U. S. Army was small, unprepared and under equipped for modern warfare compared to other armies. This was soon realized shortly after the Spanish-American War by the then Secretary of War, Elihu Root who soon started a new reformation. He saw the need for modernization of weapons, training, financing and organization. In 1902 Secretary of War Root and Major General Charles Dick, a member of the U. S. House of Representatives as well as commander of the Ohio Militia proposed new legislation to equalized the state militias with the Regular Army. In 1903 the Dick Act was passed, which basically replaced the old Militia Act of 1792. This Act federally oriented the reserve forces and freed them from state control. It increased federal funding to compensate Guardsmen for the now required 24 drills each year, also militia officers could now attend schools. The War Department would now assign Regular Army officers as advisors and instructors and enabled states to exchange their outdated weapons and equipment for current issue. They also established the Militia Affairs Bureau, the forerunner of today’s National Guard Bureau, to oversee the organizations and training. Although the 1903 Dick Act was a benchmark and it was instrumental in strengthening the state militias there was still a great divide between the Reserve and Regular Army forces. In the first half of 1916, U.S. Army regulars as well as National Guard forces was called to face the Mexican rebel leader “Pancho” Villa during his raids on states in the American Southwest. President Woodrow Wilson and Congress saw the need to reinforce the nation’s armed forces and increase U.S. military state of preparedness.

Thus Wilson signed the National Defense Act, ratified by Congress in May 1916 into law on June 3. This Act, a milestone in the Army’s history, brought state militia’s under federal control and more importantly gave the president authority, in case of war or national emergency, to mobilize the National Guard for the duration of the emergency. It’s design and purpose was to give Federal aid, assistance, and supervision from the Federal Government in the organization and training of National Guard units and retain the rights to call the National Guard into Federal service when necessary. Also any state troops or officers of the Organized Militia by whatever name designated who existed prior to the act of June 3, 1916, would not be a part of the National Guard, unless they have specifically qualified for and received Federal recognition as by the War Department. “Federal recognition” is defined as the acceptance by the Federal Government of officers or enlisted men who have complied with the provisions of the act of June 3, 1916, and who are entitled to the benefits of the act. This National Defense Act mandated that the term “National Guard” be used to refer to the network of state militias and that they be used as the primary reserve force for the U.S. Army.

All National Guard units would now be organized and trained to the standards of regular Army units. The federal government would be obligated to pay guardsmen because Annual training was increased from 5 to 15 days per year and drills were increased from 24 per year to 48. This National Defense Act also established the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) which would train and prepare high school and college students for Army service. In that November of 1916, Wilson was re-elected with the campaign slogan “He kept us out of the war”, but by the following spring, Wilson had moved the United States to the brink of war after German attacks on American interests at sea. On April 2, 1917, he would go before Congress to ask for a declaration of war. Four days later, the U.S. formally entered World War I and it became very evident that it would require a far larger army than ever before to win this conflict in Europe. Although the National Defense Act of 1916 authorized the end strength of 165,000 for the Regular Army and 450,000 for the National Guard, but by 1917 both services were struggling with shortages of 44,000 and 269,000 respectively.

President Wilson wanted to use a volunteer force to supply the manpower needed to fight, but it soon became apparent that this would be almost impossible, especially when President Wilson wanted the army to increase to a force of one million strong. The new Secretary of War, Newton Baker recommended a conscripted draft which President Wilson approved of and it soon became legislated as the Selective Service Act or Selective Draft Act of 1917.

The guidelines of the Act called for all males aged 21 to 30 to register for the draft. By the end of World War I, 2.8 million men had been drafted. During World War I there were three registrations. The first, on June 5, 1917, called for all men between the ages of 21 and 31. The second, on June 5, 1918, registered those who attained age 21 after June 5, 1917. The third registration was held on September 12, 1918, for men age 18 through 45. Conscripted service was selected by 5 class ratings. The first selected would be drawn from Class I. Members of each class below Class I were available only if the pool of all available and abled bodies in the class above it were exhausted. Class I was “Eligible and Liable for Military Service” and consisted of unmarried registrants with no dependents, married registrants with an independent spouse and / or one or more dependent children over age 16 with sufficient family income if drafted. The next category was Class II “Temporarily Deferred, but Available For Military Service” and consisted of married registrants with a dependent spouse and / or dependent children under age 16 with sufficient family income if drafted. Class III was “Exempted, But Available For Military Service” and was composed of local officials, registrants who provided sole family income for dependent parents and / or siblings under age 16, and registrants employed in agricultural labor or industrial enterprises essential to the war effort. Class IV was classified as “Exempted Due To Extreme Hardship”. This included all the married registrants with dependent spouse and / or children with insufficient family income if drafted, registrants with a deceased spouse who provided sole family income for dependent children under age 16, and registrants with deceased parents who provided sole family income for dependent siblings under age 16. Lastly was Class V or “Ineligible For Military Service” and composed of state or federal officials, members of the clergy, registrants who were deemed either medically disabled or “morally unfit” for military service, and aliens. World War I ended at 11:00 a.m. on 11 November 1918 when Kaiser Wilhelm II signed the armistice agreement and 4 months later on March 31, 1919, all medical advisory boards were closed and just as rapidly as the Selective Service System was created it were soon terminated. The World War I draft had a high success rate, with few men ”dodging” the draft and this was attributed to the patriotic fervor of World War I.

The U.S. Army returned to its peacetime policies of modernizing the army, and in 1920 the new National Defense Act was signed into law. This Act authorized the largest peacetime army in the history of the United States with a ceiling of 280,000 for the Regular Army and 435,000 for the National Guard. This new Act outlined a readiness scheme that continues to shape military readiness to this day. The act divided the continental United States into nine corps areas, each corps area to have one Regular Army division, two National Guard divisions, and three Reserve divisions, for a total of fifty-four divisions. GENERAL ORDERS, No. 50., published August 20, 1920 established Corps Areas and the assignment of general officers.

GeneralOrdersNo50FrontPage

(View Actual General Order)

Congress never came close to appropriating enough money for the ceiling strength resulting in Regular Army strength reduction. Theoretically, the Regular Army divisions were supposed to be ready for deployment in 20 days after the call up and the National Guard in 30 days. Nevertheless the National Guard enjoyed this era of prosperity due to the priority for manning and equipping the 18 new divisions, 2 separate infantry regiments in Hawaii and Porto Rico and a Coast Artillery corps. The divisions kept their unit nicknames and designations adopted during World War I.

Corps Map

 The Official National Guard Register of 1922 listed the Sergeant Instructors assigned and it listed the Corps Areas and under the purposes of inspection, maneuvers, training, mobilization, and war it further grouped them into three army areas.

Army Areas Map 1921 to 1932

 The Official National Guard Register of 1922 also listed the organizations and stations of these new units. In this register you get a glance of the stationing of the 45th Division as it encompassed Colorado, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Arizona.

STATIONS of ORGANIZATION

1922 Stations of Organization per National Guard Register

1922OfficialNationalGuardregisterFrontPage

 (View Extract of 1922 National Guard Register)

 1923 Stations of Organization per National Guard Register

1923 Official National Guard Register Front Page

(View Extract of 1923 National Guard Register) 

1924 Stations of Organization per National Guard Register

1924 Official National Guard Register Front Page

 (View Extract of 1924 National Guard Register)

1925 Stations of Organization per National Guard Register

1925 Official National Guard Register Front Page

(View Extract of 1925 National Guard Register)

1926 Stations of Organization per National Guard Register

1926 Official National Guard Register Front Page

(View Extract of 1926 National Guard Register)

1927 Stations of Organization per National Guard Register

1927 Official National Guard Register Front Page

(View Extract of 1927 National Guard Register)

1928 Stations of Organization per National Guard Register

1928 Official National Guard Register Front Page

(View Extract of 1928 National Guard Register)

1929 Stations

1929 Official National Guard Register Front Page

(View Extract of 1929 National Guard Register)

1930 Stations of Organization per National Guard Register

1930 Official National Guard Register Front Page

(View Extract of 1930 National Guard Register)

1931 Stations of Organization per National Guard Register

1931 Official National Guard Register Front Page

(View Extract of 1931 National Guard Register)

1936 Stations of Organization per National Guard Register

1936 National Guard Register Cover

(View Extract of 1936 National Guard Register)

In 1930 a typical field artillery regiment under the Combined Arms Regimental System (pre-World War II) had the following Table of Organization (TO & E). It had a Regimental Headquarters, a Headquarters Battery, 6 firing batteries (Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, Delta, Echo, Foxtrot), 2 Headquarters & Headquarters Battery and Combat Trains, a Service Battery, a Medical Detachment and a Band. The First Battalion consisted of Alpha, Bravo, and Charlie batteries and First Battalion Headquarters Battery and Combat Train. The Second Battalion consisted of Delta, Echo, and Foxtrot batteries and Second Battalion Headquarters Battery and Combat Train.

158th FAR Taking Horses to Water Fort Sill, Okla. 1929

Taking Horses to Water Fort Sill, Okla. 1929

 

158th Field Artillery Regiment Watering Horses Fort Sill, Okla. 1929

158th Field Artillery Regiment Watering Horses Fort Sill, Okla. 1929

158th Field Artillery Regiment in Pass and Review Fort Sill, Okla. 1929

158th Field Artillery Regiment in Pass and Review Fort Sill, Okla. 1929

***********EXTRACT***********

Special Text No. 88, Organization of the Field Artillery, 1931 Edition, The Field Artillery School, Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

 75-MM. GUN, HORSE-DRAWN BATTERY

(T/O 38W, 1930)

75mm gun French Model

 GENERAL

The term artillery is a collective one which includes cannon (or guns, in the general sense of that term) on mountings, as distinguished from small arms, which are held in the hands. It is to be noted, however, that machine guns, although mounted, are classed as small arms.

In our army, the Field Artillery is devoted exclusively to manning artillery which accompanies an army in the field. It includes all pack artillery, all division artillery, all corps artillery (except antiaircraft artillery) and all general headquarters artillery (except antiaircraft artillery and railway artillery). In addition it includes all flash, high burst and terrestrial sound ranging units provided for the mobile army. The purpose of the Field Artillery is to assist the other arm by fire.

Field Artillery armament comprises guns, howitzers and mortars. The general term piece is applied to a weapon of any of these three types. A gun is a piece of comparatively flat trajectory and high muzzle velocity.

A howitzer in general, has a shorter tube than a gun of the same caliber, a more curved trajectory and a lower muzzle velocity. It is able, therefore, to reach targets which cannot be reached by a gun and correspondingly, to occupy positions with deep defilade impracticable for a weapon of flatter trajectory.

A mortar is a piece with a still shorter tube, lower muzzle velocity and more curved trajectory than a howitzer of the same caliber. It is designed for firing with angles of elevation greater than 45 degrees, thus giving fire with a very large angle of fall, the range decreasing as the angle of elevation is increased.

A battery consists of four pieces of like type and caliber with the personnel and equipment necessary for maintenance, maneuver and delivery of fire. It is the smallest administrative unit.

The word battery also is used to designate certain artillery units other than those containing artillery weapons, but when so used the name of the unit contains also a descriptive word; for example, “headquarters battery” .

The principal subdivisions of the battery are the battery headquarters, the firing battery and the maintenance section. When action is imminent, the battery usually is subdivided as above. The battery headquarters accompanies the battery commander or is disposed of otherwise; the firing battery proceeds toward the firing position normally under command of the executive and the maintenance section is detached and assigned a position.

75 mm Gun Horse Drawn March Formation 1930

THE BATTERY HEADQUARTERS

The battery headquarters consists of the battery commander, the reconnaissance officer, the battery commander’s detail, the first sergeant, and the battery clerk. The reconnaissance officer is in immediate charge of the battery commander’s detail and assists the battery commander. The first sergeant assists the battery commander in the administrative and discipline of the battery, keeps the guard and duty rosters, and commands at the limber positions during active operations. The battery clerk performs the necessary clerical work of the battery with the exception of keeping supply records (kept by the supply sergeant) and the guard and duty rosters (kept by the first sergeant).

The Battery Commander’s Detail

The battery commander’s detail assists the battery commander in the reconnaissance, selection and occupation of position; in the establishment and maintenance of signal communication; in liaison; in fire control and in necessary survey operations. The battery commander may not always have use for his entire detail but unless he otherwise directs, a portion of the battery commander’s detail called the Battery Commander’s Party always accompanies him.

The battery commander’s detail consists of:

a. The instrument sergeant. b. The signal sergeant. c. The battery agent (corporal). d. The instrument corporal. e. The range finder corporal. f. Two scout corporals. g. Two signal corporals. h. The battery commander’s bugler. i. Four drivers. j. Four linemen. k. Two instrument operators. l. Six telephone operators. m. Three orderlies. n. One wagoner. o. Nineteen riding horses. p. Two battery reels, each drawn by four horses. q. One mountain wagon (3-seated) drawn by four horses.

BC Detail March Formation 1930

The senior non-commissioned officer (instrument sergeant or signal sergeant) of the battery commander’s detail is in charge of the detail. The instrument sergeant assists in organizing the observation post and in calculating firing data. He is responsible for the care of the instruments. The signal sergeant is charged with the duty of establishing and maintaining signal communication within the battery. He is responsible for the good order of the animals, materiel and equipment used by the signal communication personnel. The battery agent maintains contact with the battalion commander. The instrument corporal operates instruments and acts as an observer at the observation post. The range finder corporal operates instruments and acts as an observer at the observation post. Scout corporal 1 assists the reconnaissance officer, guides the battery to position and is a member of the visual team at the observation post. Scout corporal 2 assists the reconnaissance officer, guides the battery to position and is a member of the visual team at the post of the executive. Signal corporal 1 establishes and maintains telephone circuits, is in charge of battery reel 1 and when at the command post, is in charge of the messengers. Signal corporal 2 establishes and maintains telephone circuits, is in charge of battery reel 2 and when at the command post, is in charge of the led horses at the telephone central. The battery commander’s bugler is orderly for the battery commander and when the battery is in position, is in charge of the led horses at the observation post. The four drivers drive the battery reels for each battery reel.

Reel Cart Forward Section

Reel Cart Rear Section

The four linemen assist in establishing and maintaining telephone circuits. Lineman 1 is wireman on battery reel 1; lineman 2 is wireman on battery reel 2. Instrument operator 1 assists the reconnaissance officer in survey operations, operates instruments and operates the signal lamp at the observation post. Instrument operator 2 delivers, sets up and operates the aiming circle at the post of the executive and operates the signal lamp thereat. The six telephone operators have duties as follows: Telephone operator 1 is operator for the battery commander on the command circuit. Telephone operator 2 is operator at the post of the executive. Telephone operator 3 is operator at the observation post on the conduct of fire circuit. Telephone operator 4 establishes the telephone central and operates the switchboard. Telephone operators 5 and 6 act as relief operators, assist in maintaining telephone circuits and act as messengers. Orderly 1 acts as horseholder for members of the BC Party and as a messenger; Orderlies 2 and 3 act as horseholders where required and as messengers. The wagoner drives the mountain wagon.

THE FIRING BATTERY

The firing battery, prior to occupation of position consists of:

(1) The executive. (2) Assistant executive. (3) Bugler. (4) Guidon. (5) Four gun sections (the first four). (6) The caisson section (fifth section). (7) Any attached personnel. When in position, the firing battery is considered to consist only of those elements of the battery present at the gun position. The executive is second-in-command of the battery. Normally, he commands the firing battery. The assistant executive assists the executive in the performance of his dutles. In the absence of the executive the assistant executive commands the firing battery. The bugler acts as horseholder for the executive. The guidon marks the guide of the battery. Each gun section consists of a sergeant (chief of section); a gunner corporal; a caisson corporal; nine cannoneers; six drivers; a gun with limber, drawn by a six-horse team; a caisson with limber, drawn by a six-horse team and two riding horses.

Battery Section Forward Section

Battery Section Rear Section

  The caisson section consists of a sergeant (chief of section); two caisson corporals; six cannoneers; six drivers; two caissons with limbers, each drawn by a six-horse team and two riding horses. The chiefs of section are responsible for the discipline of their sections and for the good order of all animals, materiel and equipment issued to their sections. In action, the chiefs of the first four sections command their guns; the chief of the fifth section acts as ammunition sergeant and assists the executive in the evacuation of casualties. The gunners are responsible to their chiefs of section for the good order of the wheeled materiel of their sections. The mounted caisson corporals are responsible to their chiefs of section for the good order of the horses, harness and horse equipment of their sections. During action, they command that part of their sections which is at the limber position or execute such duties as may be assigned. The dismounted caisson corporal (fifth section) is responsible to his chief of section for the good order of the wheeled materiel of the fifth section. During action, he acts as recorder at the gun position. The cannoneers assist in the service of the piece and in the care of the wheeled materiel of their sections. Suitable personnel is assigned by the battery commander to the service of the machine guns and automatic rifles of the battery. Cannoneers not required for service of the piece, machine guns and automatic rifles are used as ammunition handlers. The drivers’ are responsible to their caisson corporals for the good order of their horses, harness and horse equipment.

THE MAINTENANCE SECTION

The maintenance section consists of: a. The mess sergeant. b. The stable sergeant. c. The supply sergeant. d. The agent with the service battery. e. The chief mechanic. f. Three cooks. g. Six drivers. h. Two horseshoers, clinical. i. Two mechanics, general. j. The stable orderly. k. The saddler. l. Two wagoners. m. Five basic privates. n. Six riding horses. o. A ration and water cart, drawn by four horses. p. A rolling kitchen, drawn by four horses. q. A battery and store wagon, with forge limber, drawn by a six-horse team. This when fully loaded, is the heaviest load in the battery. r. A spare team (six-horse). Duties: The supply sergeant commands the maintenance section. He is responsible for the general care of all government property issued to the battery and is directly responsible for all government property until it has been issued. The mess sergeant is responsible for the proper messing of’the battery, for the discipline and training of the cooks and for the materiel and equipment of the mess. The stable sergeant is responsible for the general care of the public animals assigned to the battery. He is directly responsible for the care and issue of forage for sick animals, for the animals of the maintenance section and for the good order and police of the stables and picket lines. He supervises the work of the horseshoers and the saddler. He is assisted by the stable orderly. The agent with the service battery maintains contact between the battery and the service battery. The chief mechanic is responsible for the repair of the materiel of the battery. He supervises the work of the two mechanics. During action, he is attached to the firing battery. The three cooks prepare the meals. Three of the drivers drive the battery and store wagon, the other three drive the spare team. The two horseshoers, the two mechanics, and the saddler perform duties appropriate to their trades. The stable orderly assists the stable sergeant. One wagoner drives the ration and water cart the other drives the rolling kitchen.

FUNCTIONAL ORGANIZATION OF THE BATTERY

While the platoon organization of the battery is indicated by Tables of Organization, the battery is divided along functional lines into three departments: Departments A, B, and C. One of the lieutenants is in charge of each department, they assist the battery commander by seeing that his desires are carried out in the administration, training and combat operations of the battery.

Thus, except for supervision on a march, at drill, at ceremonies or in the unusual case when the platoon is separated from the battery, duties normally are assigned on a functional basis.

MATERIEL

There are three types of 75-mm. guns available for use in our service: the French, Model of 1897; the British, Model of 1917; the American, Model of 1916. As most of the light guns in our war reserve are the French 75-mm., it will be the only one described.

Compared to types of approximately the same calibel in use by other nations, it is light in weight. The weight of the gun and limber, completely equipped with ammunition and tools is 4,586 pounds; 765 pounds per draft animal.

The sight is simple and rugged, but without the telescopic and panoramic features of the American type. Eventually this gun will be equipped with the American panoramic sight.

The recoil system is of the type known as hydro-pneumatic. The recoil is checked by a hydraulic brake (oil) and the gun is returned into firing position (battery) by the force of gas compressed by the energy of the recoil. Due to the very fine adjustments required between parts, no repairs or adjustment of the interior of the recoil mechanism are permitted in the field. The complete recoil mechanism must be sent to special repair depots.

The gun carriage traverses on the axle by means of a geared nut. This system limits the traverse to about three degrees on each side of the center.

Shields are provided for the protection of the cannoneers.

The ammunition is fixed. The projectils are shrapnel, weight about 16 pounds; high explosive shell (Mark I), weight about 12 pounds; gas shell and smoke shell. A high explosive shell (Mark IV), weight about 13.1 pounds and with a longer range will supersede the 12 pound (Mark I) shell as soon as the supply of the latter is exhausted. The extreme range of the Mark I shell is 8,800 yards. The extreme range with the new shell (Mark IV) is about 12,500 yards. The muzzle velocity with the Mark I shell is 1,805 feet per second, and witb the Mark IV shell, 1,955 feet per second. A reduced charge also is provided, giving a muzzle velocity of 1,130 feet per second and an extreme range with the Mark I shell of 7,000 yards. This charge gives angles of fall approximately twice as great as those obtained with the normal charge, thus permitting fire on steep reverse slopes and other ground whIch cannot be reached witb the normal charge.

The limber is the two-wheeled vehicle which supports the trail of the gun carriage or caisson in transport making therewith, in each case, a four-wheeled vehicle. Mounted on the axle of the limber is a steel chest containing 39 compartments. The caisson limber carries 37 rounds of ammunition, one can of kerosene and one can of lubricating oil. The gun limber carries 35 rounds of ammunition, one can of grease, one can of kerosene, one can of lubricating oil and one can of recoil oil.

The caisson body has a large steel chest carrying 70 rounds of ammunition and a hinged shield which can be dropped to the ground to give protection to the cannoneers. Like the gun carriage, the caisson body is connected to its limber by a pintle and lunette. The caisson body, with the limber, is referred to as the caisson and weighs approximately 4,980 pounds when filled with shrapnel.

Units of these guns assigned to divisions are horse-drawn, while units assigned to the GHQ reserve artillery are either tractor-drawn or carried in trucks (portee). In horse-drawn units the materiel is drawn by teams of six horses; each team being attached to a limber. The team is arranged in pairs, each pair being driven by a man mounted on the left (near) horse. The weight behind the team is such that the carriage can be easily drawn at a walk or trot over roads or across country.

For short distances, when necessary, it can be drawn at a gallop. The vehicles can be driven over practically any ground over which a mounted man can pass, provided the available track is not too narrow for the width of the carriage. The cannoneers ride on the caisson body and limber chests. They dismount and walk when it is necessary to lighten the load behind the teams.

THE BATTALION, THE REGIMENT AND THE BRIGADE

THE BATTALION

The battalion is primarily a tactical unit. The functions of its commander are purely tactical and not administrative or technical. He directs but does not conduct fire.

The battalion contains a headquarters, a headquarters battery, a battalion combat train (GHQ reserve artillery battalions have no battalion combat trains) and a certain number of batteries (two in medium and heavy artillery; three in horsedrawn, horse, pack, portee and tractor-drawn 75-mm. units).

The battalion headquarters consists of the battalion commander and the battalion staff. The members of the staff and some of their more important duties are as follows:

The executive relieves the battalion commander of as many of the details of routine as practicable, and insures the smooth working of the staff and of the enlisted personnel attached to battalion headquarters.

S-1 handles such administrative paper work as is required of the battalion, commands the rear echelon of the battalion, controls the postal service and assists the other staff officers.

S-2 is responsible for collecting, collating, evaluating and disseminating military information and intelligence.

S-3 assists the battalion commander in preparing such orders, messages and charts as are necessary to carry out the tactical plan and keeps such records of tactical events as are necessary. In higher units, one or more operations clerks assist S-3; when such personnel is necessary in the battalion, one or more clerks are detailed for this duty.

S-4 is the supply and munitions officer of the battalion. He keeps himself, the battalion commander and the staff informed as to the state of ammunition supply in the battalion and takes the necessary steps to insure that the battalion is properly supplied with ammunition at all times, in accordance with the contemplated operations.

The liaison officers (two) form connecting links between the artillery battalion and the infantry it is supporting.

They keep their battalion commander informed as to the needs of the infantry and advise the infantry commander as to the possibilities of fire support by the artillery. The reconnaissance officer supervises the work of the scouts and observers, performs survey operations, prepares sketches, maps and charts, assists the battalion commander in reconnaissance and fire direction and at times acts as assistant to S-3. The communication officer has a dual capacity. As a staff officer, he is adviser to the battalion commander on matters pertaining to signal communication of the battalion and is responsible for the establishment and maintenance of all signal communication established by the battalion headquarters battery. As a commander he commands the battalion headquarters battery. The battalion headquarters battery consists of the reconnaissance, observation, orientation, intelligence, liaison and communication enlisted personnel and the equipment, animals and motors necessary for the proper functioning of the battalion in these respects. The greater part of the battalion headquarters and headquarters battery is comprised of the battalion detail. The battalion combat train consists of a train headquarters, two or three ammunition platoons (i.e, one platoon for each battery in the battalion) and a mainatenance section. The train headquarters contains the necessary person for the command, administration and proper tactical functioning of the train. The platoons contain the personnel and materiel necessary to handle and transport ammunition. The maintenance section contains the personnel and materiel necessary for the supply of the train and for the repair and maintenance of the materiel thereof.

THE REGIMENT

The regiment is both a tactical and administrative unit and the functions of its commander are both tactical and administrative in nature. Regiments have six gun-batteries. Hence, in regiments having two-battery battalions, there are three battalions and in regiments having three-battery battalions, there are two battalions. There is also a regimental headquarters and headquarters battery, a band, a service battery the attached chaplain and a medical detachment. The regimental headquarters consists of the regimental commander and the regimental staff. The organization of the staff is similar, in general, to the organization of the battalion staff and the duties of the staff officers are similar to those of the corresponding battalion staff officers. The regimental headquarters battery consists of the reconnaissance, observation, orientation, intelligence, communication and liaison enlisted personnel and the equipment, animals and motors necessary for the proper functioning of the regiment in these respects. Included in personnel are certain non-commissioned officers and privates whose duties primarily are connected with the supply and administration of the regimental headquarters battery such as the first sergeant, mess sergeant supply sergeant, battery clerk, mechanics and horseshoers. Other individuals primarily are concerned with their duties as assistants to members of the regimental staff. The band is a separate organization, commanded by S-1, but attached to one of the other units for administration, mess and supply. It is transported by the service battery. In T/O 33W, the band is included in the column with the regimental headquarters. The service battery consists of the administrative and supply personnel and equipment, animals and motors necessary for the supply of the regiment. It is organized into four operating groups: (1) The Service Battery Command and Administration Group. (2) The Regimental Personnel Administration Group. (3) The Regimental Supply (Other Than Ammunition Administration Group. (4) The Regimental Supply (Other Than Ammunition Transportation Group. The Service Battery Command and Administrative Group: like any other unit, the service battery has the necessary battery headquarters personnel for battery command and administration purposes. This includes the service battery commander, first sergeant, agent, clerk, bugler, etc. The service battery also must be fed, clothed and otherwise supplied. This requires the equivalent of a maintenance section, as found in a gun or howitzer battery; included are a rolling kitchen, a ration and water cart and other vehicles for battery supplies and equipment, together with a battery supply sergeant, battery mess sergeant, battery stable sergeant, battery mechanics, cooks, etc. The service battery commander is responsible for the training and operation of this group. One of the battery officers (usually the 2d Lieutenant) assists the battery commander in battery command and administration. The Regimental Personnel Administration Group includes a lieutenant (regimental personnel adjutant assistant S-1), a master sergeant, a sergeant and two corporals. It prepares and keeps all of the records and paper work concerning all the personnel of the regiment. This group operates under the supervision of S-1. The Regimental Supply (Other Than Ammunition) Administration Group includes a master sergeant and a staff sergeant. The group keeps the records of all supplies (other than ammunition) within the regiment, prepares consolidated requests for supplies (other than ammunition) and supervises the issue of all supplies (other than ammunition). It is trained by and operates under, S-4. The Regimental Supply (Other Than Ammunition Transportation Group is divided into three sections: (a) One regimental section. (b) Two battalion sections. The regimental section carries the band (a separate organization commanded by S-1) and supplies and equipment for the regimental headquarters and headquarters battery, the service battery and the band. Each battalion section carries the supplies and equipment for its battalion. When a battalion is detached from the regiment, the battalion section accompanies the battalion. In such cases, certain other personnel of the battery accompanies it. When neither battalion is detached from the regiment the entire transportation of the service battery is pooled and operated by the service battery commander according to the requirements of the situation. The wagon-masters and assistant wagon-masters may be compared to chiefs of section and caisson corporals, respectively, of gun batteries. The assistant wagoners are used to load, unload and issue supplies. Certain of the personnel in the service batteries of 75-mm. horse-drawn regiments are shown by Tables of Organization as individually mounted. The remaining personnel of all service batteries ride on vehicles of the battery. The chaplain directs the religious activities of the regiment. The medical detachment consists of personnel from the medical corps, the dental corps and for regiments having animals, from the veterinary corps. The senior medical officer is the regimental surgeon and as such, has the two functions of regimental staff officer and commander of the medical detachment.

THE BRIGADE

The brigade is primarily a tactical unit, except in the matter of ammunition supply. For this reason the brigade commander and his staff are concerned primarily with the tactical handling of the brigade. When it becomes necessary the brigade commander supervises administration and supply in order to insure the proper functioning of the regiments and he lends assistance to the regiments in securing their supplies. The supply of ammunition to the regiments is a very important function of the brigade commander. The principal subdivisions of the division artillery brigade are: The brigade headquarters and headquarters battery, organized for functions corresponding to those of the similar units in the battalion and regiment. Three regiments, two being 75-mm. gun regiments, horse-drawn; one, a 155-mm. howitzer regiment, tractor-drawn. The ammunition train is used to provide a mobile reserve of ammunition for the regiments and to provide, during action, a means of transporting ammunition from supply points (refilling points, rail-heads, ordnance depots) in the rear areas up to the vicinity of the battery positions, where battalion combat trains may take over that duty. The corps artillery brigade also contains a headquarters and headquarters battery, three regiments (two 155-mm. howitzers; one, 155-mm. gun), and a brigade ammunition train. In addition, it includes a sound and flash battalion and has attached an ordnance company (medium maintenance).

———-END OF EXTRACT———-

 

crest

The 158th Field Artillery was constituted on 26 February 1920 as per Militia Bureau Circular 325.4 dtd 26 Feb 1920 and was originally organized as a National Guard Artillery Regiment with units located in Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico. When the 45th Infantry Division was activated as a National Guard Division in 1923 with units located in Oklahoma and the other three states, it was determined that the 158th Field Artillery, as a second direct support artillery regiment, would be mostly located in Oklahoma. This required several new batteries to be activated in Oklahoma and some transferred from Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico. Only Battery A was left in its location in Roswell, New Mexico, and Battery E in its location in Mesa, Arizona.

Table of Organization and Equipment (TO&E)

Table 9 Artillery Regiment

Table 10 Light Artillery Regiment 1914

Table 11 Artillery Battalion

This reorganization of the regiment in 1923 took place, with subsequent changes up to the time of induction into federal service for World War II on September 16, 1940 as follows: Regimental Headquarters Battery was activated on May 8, 1923 at Sulphur, Oklahoma with Captain Charles N. Hardin commanding. 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery and Combat Train was activated on June 16, 1927 at Clinton, Oklahoma, with Captain George D. Hann commanding.

George D. Hann

George D. Hann

Battery A (organized in April, 1909, as a unit of New Mexico National Guard) located at Roswell, New Mexico, an remained at that location. It was in Federal Service on the Mexican Border on 8 June 1916 through 23 March 1917 plus WW I service 24 April 1917 through 5 August 1917. Re-designated Battery A, 146th Field Artillery on 23 September 1917, it served overseas from 24 December 1917 to 15 June 1919. Demobilized, Fort Bliss, Texas 2 July 1919. Reorganized 1st Field Artillery, New Mexico National Guard, 27 June 1921 and again reorganized as Battery A, 158th Field Artillery, 10 February 1922. Battery B was activated at Anadarko, Oklahoma on January 1, 1927 by transfers of personnel from Company L, 2nd Oklahoma Infantry and Battery E, 160th Field Artillery. Battery C was transferred from Pueblo, Colorado and activated at Perry, Oklahoma on January 14, 1927 with Captain Howard R. Cress commanding.

Howard R. Cress

Howard R. Cress

2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery and Combat Train was activated on May 15, 1923 at Kingfisher, Oklahoma with Captain Clarence R. Steele commanding. This battery was activated by transfer of personnel from the 160th Field Artillery in Kingfisher, Oklahoma.

Clarence R. Steele

Clarence R. Steele

Battery D was activated in Weatherford, Oklahoma, in June of 1924 with Captain Cortis A. Clark commanding. This activation was by a transfer of an artillery battery previously located at Flagstaff, Arizona. Battery E (organized 24 March 1921 as a unit of the Arizona National Guard) was left at is location in Mesa, Arizona. Battery F was activated in 1923 at Kingfisher, Oklahoma with Captain George I. Lacey commanding. This activation resulted from the transfer of a unit located at Hugo, Oklahoma. On March 1, 1937 the battery was transferred from Kingfisher, Oklahoma to Duncan, Oklahoma where command was assumed by Captain Hugh A. Neal.

Hugh A. Neal

Hugh A. Neal

Service Battery was activated on May 9, 1923 at Hugo, Oklahoma with Captain Xerma R. Campbell commanding. This battery was later transferred to Kingfisher, Oklahoma. Medical Detachment was transferred from Colorado and activated at Yale, Oklahoma on October 13, 1928 with Captain Robert S. Graham commanding. The Band was located at Perry, Oklahoma in 1928 under command of Warrant Officer William C. Marshall. When the reorganized regiment became part of the newly activated 45th Division in May of 1923 Colonel Charles A. Holden, then of Pawhuska, Oklahoma, was appointed its commander. Lieutenant Colonel Grover C. Wamsley of Anadarko was second in command.

Charles A. Holden

Charles A. Holden

The first four Oklahoma-assigned batteries attended Summer Camp at Camp Doniphan, Fort Sill, Oklahoma in August of 1924. As more batteries of the regiment were activated and located in Oklahoma, summer training involved a larger regiment until finally the two out-of-state batteries, those at Roswell, New Mexico, and Mesa, Arizona, also traveled to Fort Sill, Oklahoma for Summer Camp. The entire regiment trained together at Fort Sill beginning in 1927. In September 1925, Colonel Holden moved to command the 160th Field Artillery Regiment in the 45th Division, and newly-promoted Colonel Grover C. Wamsley

Grover Cleveland Wamsley

Grover C. Wamsley

assumed command of the 158th Field Artillery Regiment in the 45th Division and continued to command the regiment when it was inducted into federal service for World War II on September 16, 1940 with Major Marion D. Woodworth in command of the 1st Battalion and Major Clarence R. Steele in command of the 2nd Battalion.

Marion D. Woodworth

Marion D. Woodworth

158 Regiment Title Line

The third regiment of Field Artillery required to complete the artillery brigade of the 45th Division was originally allotted by the War Department to Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico. By 1921, however, Oklahoma was “artillery minded”. Strange happenings had been observed in the armories at Wewoka, Pittsburg, and Wellston during the winter of 1920-21. Drill halls accustomed to the aphrodisiac tread of infantrymen wheeling in the latest Follies formations rocked to the hurry and scurry of wagon soldiers as they executed “Cannoneers, Post” or simulated horses in maneuvers of “left wheel” and “double sections, right oblique”. The much publicized white horses had cavorted through the main street of Wewoka, under personal direction of Capt. W. S. Key; 32 sleek bays had been entrusted to the tender care of Capt. Henry Donahue, at Pittsburg, and in Wellston, until then a one horse town, a mixed assortment of grays, blacks and bays, all of whom had reached a legal voting age, were under the spiritual guidance of Captain Barnett, a Methodist minister of the gospel. The citizens and taxpayers of Oklahoma were clamoring for more artillery and Uncle Charley Barrett was not one to let the citizens and taxpayers clamor in vain.

By the Spring of 1923 a series of diplomatic “ying-yangings” had resulted in four units of the 158th Field Artillery, located in Arizona, being re-allotted to Oklahoma. First to complete organization was Battery, “F”, at Kingfisher, under command of Capt. George I. Lacey, with First Lieuts. Lee M. Grimes and Elva B. Shively and Second Lieut. Mark Wagner.

Vehicle Stenciling

Vehicle Stenciling

They were inspected for Federal recognition April 23, 1923. Fifteen days later, May 8, 1923, Headquarters Battery, 158th Field Artillery, assembled at Sulphur, Oklahoma for its first formation. The occasion was inspection for Federal recognition and the unit, commanded by Capt. Charles N. Hardin, with Dewey H. Neal as First Lieutenant, passed the required tests and was formally recognized by the Federal Government. On the night following the inspection at Sulphur, May 9, 1923, the Service Battery, 158th Field Artillery, under command of Capt. Xerma R. Campbell, with Lieuts. Aurelius D. Hanry, George W. Dodd, Jr., and Otto A. Brewer, was accorded Federal recognition at Hugo, Oklahoma. Headquarters Battery and Combat Train of the First Battalion, 160th Field Artillery, which had been organized November 16, 1921, at Kingfisher, was re-designated August 4, 1923, just a week before opening of the 1923 encampment, as Headquarters Battery and Combat Train, Second Battalion, 158th Field Artillery. This, the last of the four units of the 158th to be organized in 1923, was commanded by Capt. Clarence R. Steele with Lieuts. Edward C. Newer and Jerry F. Yergler. Col. Charles A. Holden, then of Pawhuska, had been appointed Colonel of the newly organized Regiment, with Lieut. Col. Grover C. Wamsley, of Anadarko, second in command. On August 10, 1923, the four new batteries of Oklahoma Field Artillery descended upon Camp Doniphan, at Ft. Sill, with horses, guns, spare parts and accessories, for their first annual encampment. They were referred to as the “Mexican Army” because of their numerous high ranking officers and their widely scattered units. The remainder of the Regiment had been organized, during the Spring of 1923, in Arizona, New Mexico and Colorado. In June, 1924, Battery “D,”at Flagstaff, Arizona, was ordered moved to Weatherford, Oklahoma and this unit, under command of Capt. Cortis A. Clark, with Lieuts. “Dutch”Voyles, William H. Doughty and Eugene Stewart, was the last of five batteries which were to represent Oklahoma’s contingent of the 158th Field Artillery for the succeeding three years. For three encampments, 1924, 1925 and 1926, the five units of the “Mexican Army” fought their battles on the firing line at Ft. Sill alone. In the Fall of 1926, however, General Barrett again went to market and returned with Batteries “B” and “C” from Colorado.

MajWoodworthColWamsleyMajGanttBGMcLain

Maj. Woodworth Col. Wamsley Maj. Gantt BG. McLain

Colonel Wamsley, of Anadarko, had assumed command of the Regiment in September, 1925, and it was considered advisable to transfer Battery “E” of the 160th Field Artillery, also at Anadarko, over to the 158th. This was done on January 1, 1927, the battery at Anadarko, under command of Capt. Paul E. Anderson, with Lieuts. Bernhard W. Hammert, Ed Correia and George Moran, being re-designated as Battery “B,” 158th Field Artillery. Battery “C,” transferred from Pueblo, Colorado, was organized at Perry, January 14th of the same year, by Capt. Howard R. Cress and Lieutenants Blake, Noah and Brengle.

organizational chart

Regimental Organizational Chart

The Medical Detachment, also obtained from Colorado, was formed at Yale, under command of Capt. Robert S. Graham, October 13, 1928. This completed the Regimental organization, as the Regimental Band, after hibernating in Hugo and migrating, for a short spell, to Chickasha, had finally settled at its present location, in Perry, under direction of Warrant Officer William C. Marshall, July 21, 1928. All units of the Regiment, with the exception of Battery “A,” at Roswell, New Mexico, and Battery “E,” at Mesa, Arizona, are now located in Oklahoma. These two units, both excellent organizations, drive overland each year, from Roswell and Mesa, for summer training with the remainder of the Regiment. The “Mexican Army,” from a lowly beginning, and after years of adversity, has developed into a complete, modernly equipped and well trained Regiment of the United States Field Artillery.

COL Grover C. Wamsley

COL Grover C. Wamsley

Colonel Wamsley was born in Huttonsville, West Virginia, on October 8, 1884. He enlisted in the National Army at Camp Taylor, Kentucky, on August 29, 1918, and served as an enlisted man in the Field Artillery C. O. T. S., Camp Taylor, Kentucky, until he was discharged on December 18, 1918. On August 6, 1921, he was appointed as First Lieutenant, Field Artillery, Oklahoma National Guard; promoted to Captain, February 16, 1923, and to Lieutenant Colonel, May 15, 1923. He was promoted to Colonel on September 23, 1925, and assigned to command the 158th Field Artillery, with station at Anadarko, which assignment he has held continuously to the present date.

158th Field Artillery Regimental Commander

Grover Cleveland Wamsley

Grover Cleveland Wamsley

 

Staff and Regimental Unit Officers

Lieutenant Colonel Edgar B. Ross………….Executive Officer

Edgar B. Ross

Edgar B. Ross

Major Clarence C. Hightower…………………Chaplain

Clarence C. Hightower

Clarence C. Hightower

Major Parkey H. Anderson…………………….M. C. Medical Department Detachment

Parkey H. Anderson

Parkey H. Anderson

Captain William C. Cooley……………………..Personel & Training Officer (P.T. & O.)

William C. Cooley

William C. Cooley

Captain Dwight U. Cochrane………………….Service Battery Commander

Dwight U. Cochrane

Dwight U. Cochrane

Captain Owen Black………………………………..Adjutant

Owen Black

Owen Black

Captain Frank L. Miller……………………………D. C. Medical Department Detachment

Frank L. Miller

Frank L. Miller

Captain Jessie R. Waltrip………………………….M. C. Medical Department Detachment

Jesse R. Waltrip

Jesse R. Waltrip

Captain John C. Powell…………………………….Headquarters Battery Commander

John C. Powell

John C. Powell

First Lieutenant Powell E. Fry……………………M. C. Medical Department Detachment

Powell E. Fry

Powell E. Fry

First Lieutenant  Phillip A. Monahan…………..Liaison Officer

Philip A. Monohan

Philip A. Monohan

First Lieutenant William L. Shamel……………..Headquarters Battery

William L. Shamel

William L. Shamel

First Lieutenant Irving J. Strickland……………Service Battery

Irving J. Strickland

Irving J. Strickland

Second Lieutenant William R. Meredith……….Service Battery

William R. Meredith

William R. Meredith

Second Lieutenant Tarlton B. Townsend……….Service Battery

Tarlton B. Townsend

Tarlton B. Townsend

 

 Medical Department Detachment

158th Field Artillery Regiment

Yale, Oklahoma

The Medical Department Detachment, 158th Field Artillery, was organized and Federally recognized at Yale on October 13, 1928. The unit has progressed steadily since its organization, despite several changes in officer personnel, and is now located in its new Armory and has attained a high state of training under its present commanding officer, Capt. Jesse R. Waltrip.

Medical Department Detachment NonCommissioned Officers 1938

Medical Department Detachment NonCommissioned Officers 1938

Medical Department Detachment Battalion Aid Station 1938

Medical Department Detachment Battalion Aid Station 1938

Medical Department Detachment Clavicle Fracture 1938

Medical Department Detachment Clavicle Fracture 1938

 

Medical Department Detachment

Medical Department Detachment

 Headquarters Battery

158th Field Artillery Regiment

Sulphur, Oklahoma

Headquarters Battery, 158th Field Artillery was organized and located in Sulphur through the efforts of Charles N. Hardin, who was commissioned a Captain, Field Artillery, and placed in command, the unit being Federally recognized May 8, 1923. Dewey H. Neal was commissioned a First Lieutenant and served until 1924, when he resigned. John C. Powell, Captain, Infantry, O.R.C., was commissioned a First Lieutenant and assigned to Headquarters Battery.

Headquarters Battery 1- Instrument Section 1938

Headquarters Battery 1- Instrument Section 1938

In April, 1926, Captain Hardin having resigned, Lieutenant Powell took over command of the Battery and was promoted to Captain May 23, 1926. Sgt. Earl Miller was commissioned First Lieutenant, but resigned in 1928 and was succeeded by Dr. W. L. Shamel of the Dental Reserve, who was commissioned First Lieutenant, Field Artillery.

Headquarters Battery 2- Motor Section 1938

Headquarters Battery 2- Motor Section 1938

Events the old timers remember best are the times horses were assigned to the Battery in 1927 and trucks were assigned in 1933. When the unit was motorized, its members staged the “Last Horse Parade” and a moving picture was made of the event.

Headquarters Battery 3- Locker Room 1938

Headquarters Battery 3- Locker Room 1938

Headquarters Battery 4- Radio Section 1938

Headquarters Battery 4- Radio Section 1938

In the spring of 1937 the Battery moved into its magnificent fire-proof Armory, and on May 27 and 28 held dedicatory exercises which were broadcast throughout Oklahoma. A three thousand copy edition of the Battery magazine “The Reel Cart,” profusely illustrated, was printed and widely distributed. This was made possible only by the loyal support and contributions of the citizens of Sulphur and members of the Battery. The unit has to date maintained a continuously satisfactory rating.

Headquarters Battery 5- NonCommissioned Officers 1938

Headquarters Battery 5- NonCommissioned Officers 1938

Headquarters Battery 6- Scout Section 1938

Headquarters Battery 6- Scout Section 1938

 

Officers Headquarters Battery

 HeadQuarters Battery

HeadQuarters Battery 1

Service Battery (Less Band)

158th Field Artillery Regiment

Kingfisher, Oklahoma

2d Bn 158th FA Motor Vehicle

2d Bn 158th FA Motor Vehicle

The first National Guard unit in Kingfisher was organized in 1921 under the command of Capt. John J. McCartney, and was designated Headquarters Detachment and Combat Train, First Battalion, 160th Field Artillery. Other officers of the Battery were First Lieut. Edward C. Newer and Second Lieut. Lee M. Grimes. The Battery had an enlisted strength of fifty-two men.

Service Battery 1-Truck Equipment 1938

Service Battery 1-Truck Equipment 1938

By 1923 the unit’s personnel had increased to over eighty enlisted men and in April of that year was divided into two batteries, Battery “F,” 158th Field Artillery and Headquarters Battery and Combat Train, First Battalion, 158th Field Artillery.

Headquarters 2nd Battalion 158th Field Artillery

Headquarters 2nd Battalion 158th Field Artillery

Captain McCartney was promoted to the rank of Major and placed in command of the Second Battalion, 158th Field Artillery. First Sgt. George I. Lacey of the old unit was promoted to Captain and placed in command of the firing battery, with Clarence R. Steele, Signal Sergeant, raised to Captain and given command of the Battalion Headquarters unit.

Service Battery 3-Armory Athletics 1938

Service Battery 3-Armory Athletics 1938

Service Battery 4-Pistol Marksman 1938

Service Battery 4-Pistol Marksman 1938

Since that date the personnel of Battery “F” has served under command of the following: Marion R. Woodworth, Major now commanding the First Battalion, 158th Field Artillery; Miles E. Elder; Clarence R. Steele, Major now commanding the Second Battalion; and Van L. Ogden. On March 1, 1937 the unit was re-designated the Service Battery less Band Section of the 158th Field Artillery. Below is a program for a Banquet and Ball that was held the 13th of February, 1926. Captain Woodworth was the Battery Commander and George W. Evans was the Battery First Sergeant.

Battery F Banquet and Ball 1926 Front Page

View Actual Menu

Kingfisher Armory

Kingfisher Armory

Captain Dwight U. Cochrane 1938 Fort Sill

Captain Dwight U. Cochrane 1938 Fort Sill

On June 1, 1937 Capt. Dwight U. Cochrane, commanding officer of Headquarters and Combat Train, Second Battalion, 158th Field Artillery was transferred to the command of the unit.

Service Battery 5-Softball Team 1938

Service Battery 5-Softball Team 1938

Service Battery 6-NonCommissioned Officers 1938

Service Battery 6-NonCommissioned Officers 1938

The history of the unit, both as a firing Battery and a Service Battery is replete with commendations on its training, appearance and ability “to get the job done.”

Officers Service Battery

Service Battery

Pre WW II Crest

First Battalion 158th Field Artillery Regiment

Major Marion D. Woodworth……………………………..Commander First Battalion One Hundred Fifty-Eight Field Artillery

Captain George D. Hann…………………………………….Commander Headquarters Battery and Combat Train

Captain Paul E. Anderson…………………………………….Commander Battery B

Captain Howard R. Cress…………………………………….Commander Battery C

Officers 1st Battalion

Headquarters Battery and Combat Train

 First Battalion 158th Field Artillery Regiment

Clinton, Oklahoma

 The Headquarters Battery and Combat Train, First Battalion, 158th Field Artillery was organized at Clinton on June 16th, 1927 under the direct supervision of Col. Grover C. Wamsley of the 158th Field Artillery. The Battery has a high esprit de corps and with one exception in eleven years has received a very high rating on the annual Federal inspection. The attendance at the inspection has been 100 per cent, also with but one exception.

1st Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 1-Truck Drivers 1938

1st Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 1-Truck Drivers 1938

1st Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 2-Message Center 1938

1st Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 2-Message Center 1938

In the spring of 1934, during the flood of the Washita river in which fifteen lives were lost, this Battery, in company with Battery “D” of Weatherford, was on duty for thirteen days searching for bodies and serving as guards over property. The problem of supplies, sanitation and handling refugees in general was a serious one but there was not a single case where a conflict arose between civil or military law, or between soldier and civilian.

1st Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 3- Communication Section 1938

1st Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 3- Communication Section 1938

1st Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 4- NonCommissioned Officers 1938

1st Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 4- NonCommissioned Officers 1938

1st Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 5- Instrument Section 1938

1st Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 5- Instrument Section 1938

Two members who were connected with the Battery in the beginning and who are still affiliated with it are Capt. George D. Hann, who has served as commander since the organization of the unit, and Lieut. Ernest J. Stocks, who is serving as Senior Lieutenant. Second Lieut. Henry T. Ford completes the officer personnel. The new Armory recently occupied by the unit has added greatly to the efficiency of the Battery and the morale of the men.

 

Officers Headquarters Brty Combat Train 1st Bn

 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery and Combat Train

Battery A

First Battalion 158th Field Artillery Regiment

Roswell, New Mexico

 Battery B

First Battalion 158th Field Artillery Regiment

Anadarko, Oklahoma

Battery “B,” 158th Field Artillery, was organized during the summer of 1918 and was Federally recognized and designated as Company “L,” Second Oklahoma Infantry. Under the command of Capt. Arthur B. Colbath, with Lieuts. L. C. Blackstock, Charles C. Slemp and Loren Ward the Company attended camp at old Camp Doniphan, Fort Sill, during the summer of 1919, and was called into state service at Wilburton and McAlester during coal field disturbances in that year.

B Battery 1- Truck and Drivers 1938

B Battery 1- Truck and Drivers 1938

B Battery 2- Gun in Action 1938

B Battery 2- Gun in Action 1938

B Battery 3- Signal Detail 1938

B Battery 3- Signal Detail 1938

In July, 1921, the Infantry Company gave way to one battery of horse drawn artillery, which was under command of Capt. John D. Brown, and designated as Battery “E,” 160th Field Artillery. The personnel of the new battery was nearly the same as that of the old infantry unit.

B Battery 4- NonCommissioned Officers 1938

B Battery 4- NonCommissioned Officers 1938

B Battery 5- Loading Guns 1938

B Battery 5- Loading Guns 1938

B Battery 6- Instrument Detail 1938

B Battery 6- Instrument Detail 1938

The Battery attended camp for the first time in 1922. It was re-designated Battery “B,” 158th Field Artillery on January 1, 1927 and was motorized June 5, 1933. Successive battery commanders and their Lieutenants are: 1922-Captain John D. Brown, First Lieut. Grover C. Wamsley, Second Lieut. Clifford D. Lyon. 1923-Captain Grover C. Wamsley, First Lieut. Edgar B. Ross, First Lieut. Paul E. Anderson, Second Lieut. Edward S. Correia. 1923-Capt Edgar B. Ross, First Lieut. Paul E. Anderson, First Lieut. Bernhard Hammert, Second Lieut. Edward S. Correia. 1924-Capt. John A. Smith, First Lieut. Paul E. Anderson, First Lieut. Bernhard Hammert, Second Lieut. Edward S. Correia. 1925- Capt. Paul E. Anderson, First Lieut. Bernhard Hammert, First Lieut. Merl R. Warren, First Lieut. Bruce Y. Dutcher, Second Lieut. Edward S. Correia, Second Lieut. Philip Monahan, Second Lieut. Elmo V. Loomis, Second Lieut. George C. Moran, Second Lieut. Carl E. Hall, Second Lieut. Wm B. McFadyen.  

Officers Battery B

 Bravo Battery

Bravo Battery 1

 Battery C

First Battalion 158th Field Artillery Regiment

Perry, Oklahoma

In 1926, when the 168th Field Artillery (Horse) was allotted to Colorado, “Uncle Charley” Barrett, by one of the “judicious” for which he is famous, succeeded in obtaining Battery “C,” of the 158th Field Artillery, then stationed at Pueblo, Colorado. Many Oklahoma cities were clamoring for Field Artillery units but it was determined that Perry, Oklahoma, should have priority and on January 14, 1927, 65 embryo Field Artillerymen, recruited by 65 embryo Field Artillerymen, recruited by Capt. Howard R. Cress, First Lieut. William Z. Blake and Second Lieuts. Ralph H. Noah and Edward Q. Brengle, stood their formation for Federal recognition.

C Battery 1- 75mm Gun in Action 1938

C Battery 1- 75mm Gun in Action 1938

C Battery 2- Instrument Detail 1938

C Battery 2- Instrument Detail 1938

The formation was held in an empty store, on Courthouse Square. The Federal government was represented by First Lieut. John W. Beck, U.S. Army, while State authority was represented by Capt. Elmo Flynt, of the Adjutant General’s staff. One of the highlights of this ceremony was occasioned by the fact that the unit had been meticulously coached, for days preceding the formation, in the execution of “Open ranks, March,” being assured that this would be their first command. Imagine the amazement of the Inspecting Officer, upon taking command and giving ‘Right dress,’ to see the entire unit studiously and faultlessly executing “Open ranks”.

C Battery 3- NonCommissioned Officers 1938

C Battery 3- NonCommissioned Officers 1938

C Battery 4- Telephone Section 1938

C Battery 4- Telephone Section 1938

Only two changes in commissioned personnel have been made in the eleven and one-half years of this organization’s existence. Capt. Howard R. Cress is still functioning as Battery Commander in 1939, while Edward Q. “Quine” Brengle, one of the original Second Lieutenants, was promoted to First Lieutenant December 2, 1929, and is still Battery Executive.

18 July 1939 Regimental Commendation Front Page

(View Actual Regimental Commendation)

All four of the present Battery officers are charter members of the organization. The principal “turnover” has been in Second Lieutenants, Lieut. Ralph H. Noah being required to move from Perry shortly after organization and Lieut. John A. Samuelson, his successor, being compelled, for business reasons, to resign in November 1931. Lieut. Otho R. Powers and Lieut. Floyd R. Laird (present Band Leader) were appointed to fill the vacancies but were succeeded, in 1931 and 1935, respectively, by the present junior officers, Second Lieut. Harold D. Roads and Second Lieut. Myrl A. McCormick.

C Battery 5- 75mm Gun Prepared for Action 1938

C Battery 5- 75mm Gun Prepared for Action 1938

C Battery 6- Map Instruction 1938

C Battery 6- Map Instruction 1938

The record of this unit is one of continued progress. It has served as a model, for many years, for other units of the Regiment in the matter of care and storage of property. Every year since organization the Battery has received the highest rating authorized on annual Armory inspection reports. The report for the 1938 inspection, conducted by Capt. Stephen Y. McGiffert, F. A., U.S. Army, concludes with the following “remark”: “For the purpose of emphasis I am obliged to state that I consider this Battery the best trained and commanded unit of all units inspected by me in this regiment.”

 

Officers Battery C

 Charlie Battery

Charlie Battery 1

 

Pre WW II Crest

 Second Battalion 158th Field Artillery Regiment

Officers 2nd Battalion

Major Clarence R. Steele………………….Commander Second Battalion One Hundred Fifty-Eight Field Artillery

Captain Glenn Gilmour………………….Commander Headquarters Battery and Combat Trains

Captain Albert R. Harris………………………………Commander Battery D

Captain John E. Weiler……………………………….Commander Battery F

Captain Aubrey Rawlings………………………..Adjutant

First Lieutenant Wilbur S. Smith………………………………………..Liaison Officer

First Lieutenant Hugh A. Neal……………………………….Intell. & P. & T. O.

First Lieutenant Van L. Ogden…………………Headquarters Battery and Combat Train

First Lieutenant Martin W. Steward……………………………………………Battery D

First Lieutenant Paul E. Scheefers………………………………………..Battery F

Second Lieutenant Geen Gilmour…………………..Headquarters Battery and Combat Train

Second Lieutenant George W. Nikkel……………………………..Battery D

Second Lieutenant Basil Shirley…………………………………………….Battery F

Second Lieutenant Ben C. Parrott……………………………………….Battery F

Headquarters Battery and Combat Train

Second Battalion 158th Field Artillery Regiment

Kingfisher, Oklahoma

 Headquarters Battery and Combat Train, Second Battalion, 158th Field Artillery, was originally Federally recognized November 16, 1921, as Headquarters Detachment and Combat Train, 160th Field Artillery. The unit was re-designated Headquarters Battery and Combat Train,158th Field Artillery (Horse Drawn) on May 15, 1923, and again re-designated Second Battalion, Headquarters Battery and Combat Train, 158th Field Artillery (Truck Drawn) in August, 1937.

2nd Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 1- Radio Section 1938

2nd Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 1- Radio Section 1938

2nd Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 2- Automatic Rifle 1938

2nd Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 2- Automatic Rifle 1938

2nd Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 3- Telephone Section 1938

2nd Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 3- Telephone Section 1938

Battery Commanders of the organization have been: Capt. John J. McCartney, 1921 to 1923; Capt. C. R. Steele, 1928; Capt. Dwight U. Cochrane, 1928 to 1937; and Capt. Glenn Gilmour, 1937 to date. Present officers of the Battery are Captain Gilmour, commanding, First Lieut. Van L. Ogden and Second Lieut. Geen Gilmour.

2nd Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 4- Visual Signal Section 1938

2nd Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 4- Visual Signal Section 1938

2nd Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 5- NonCommissioned Officers 1938

2nd Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 5- NonCommissioned Officers 1938

2nd Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 6- Instrument Section 1938

2nd Battalion HQ Battery Combat Trains 6- Instrument Section 1938

During the time the unit was a horse drawn outfit, several polo teams were organized among the officers and enlisted men, and quite a few of the players became very proficient. The Battery was mobilized for riot duty in December, 1933, and was assigned the task of guarding a prisoner held in the county jail. The expected lynching did not come off, however, and the Battery was dismissed after about four hours. Motive power of the unit now consists of four 1 1/2-ton trucks and one station wagon.

Officers Headquarters Brty Combat Train 2nd Bn

2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery and Combat Train

 

Battery D

Second Battalion 158th Field Artillery Regiment

Weatherford, Oklahoma

From the fall of 1920 to the spring of 1924 the Chamber of Commerce and other patriotic and service groups of Weatherford had attempted to obtain a Field Artillery unit of the Oklahoma National Guard. Finally, in the latter part of May, 1924, a “trade” was consummated by General Barrett and one of the two remaining firing Batteries in Arizona, Battery “D,” 158th Field Artillery, was ordered transferred, lock, stock, barrel, spare parts and accessories, to Weatherford, Oklahoma.

D Battery 1- Gun Crew in Action 1938

D Battery 1- Gun Crew in Action 1938

It was a memorable day for the civic-minded citizens who had sponsored the project when the thirty-two prancing quadrupeds, none under twenty-nine years of age, were unloaded in the railway yards at Weatherford. They snorted and “rared,” with all the vigor of their average age, as if to register their delight at being transferred from the sand dunes of Arizona to the green pastures and balmy springtime of Oklahoma. The Battery had been inspected on June 2, 1924, by Capt. John P. Crehan, of the Regular Army and recommended for Federal recognition.  There was but one difficulty: on one in Weatherford knew anything about Field Artillery. Francis M. Burks had seen service during the World War in the Air Corps; Carl Remund was an ex-pillroller; Cortis A. Clark was a local boy who had made good in the Officers’ Training Camp, graduating shortly after the Armistice, and “Dutch” Voyles, football coach at Southwestern State Teachers’ College, had graduated from the same course. Both Clark and Voyles were commissioned in the new unit, “C. A.” as a Captain and “Dutch” as First Lieutenant.

D Battery 2- Instrument Section 1938

D Battery 2- Instrument Section 1938

With date of Federal recognition officially recorded as June 2, 1924, the ex-dough boys, aviators, medical corps men and college students formed a smart aggregation. They quickly mastered the intricacies of Field Artillery harness and 75 mm guns and in August, 1924, two months after their first formation, took their place on the firing line at the Ft. Sill encampment of the Oklahoma Guard. To the astonishment of all observers they could maneuver, signal, ride, calculate firing data and shoot as well as the other Batteries of the, by this time, “seasoned” Oklahoma Field Artillery Brigade. At this first camp one of the gun crews from Weatherford registered a direct hit upon an old caisson, placed as a target, 4,000 yards distant. In Field Artillery, using indirect laying, the probability of this occurrence can be compared to holding four aces or thirteen spades.

D Battery 3- Present Guidon 1938

D Battery 3- Present Guidon 1938

At the annual encampment of 1925, 1926 and 1927 the Battery won the Regimental Cup awarded for proficiency in all departments. The rules provided that the cup should be kept permanently by any unit winning it for three years and this coveted award, consequently, was Battery “D’s” following the 1927 encampment, for keeps.

D Battery 4- NonCommissioned Officers 1938

D Battery 4- NonCommissioned Officers 1938

In March, 1930, Captain Clark moved from Weatherford and Francis M. Burks, then First Lieutenant and Battery Executive, was appointed to command the organization. Captain Burks resigned in July, 1931, because of business reasons, and Capt. Albert R. Harris, present Battery Commander, assumed command.

D Battery 5- Wire Communication Section 1938

D Battery 5- Wire Communication Section 1938

On April 7, 1935, the Battery was ordered to active duty on the Washita River for flood relief. Headquarters were established in the Clinton Armory and fourteen sentry and relief posts were established along both sides of the river from Clinton to a point two miles north of Hammon. The Battery remained on duty until April 19.

D Battery 6- Visual Signal Section 1938

D Battery 6- Visual Signal Section 1938

The record of the Battery since its organization in June, 1924, has been one of continued progress. Backed by an interested citizenry and manned by the highest type of young men, it has performed conscientiously and efficiently every duty required by Federal or State authorities. In informed military circles the “Weatherford Battery” is recognized at the present time as one of the most efficient Field Artillery units in the southwest.

 

Officers Battery D

 Delta Battery

Delta Battery 1

 

Battery E

Second Battalion 158th Field Artillery Regiment

Mesa, Arizona

 

 

Battery F

Second Battalion 158th Field Artillery Regiment

Duncan, Oklahoma

Battery “F,” 158th Field Artillery, was mustered and Federally recognized June 1, 1935, as the Service Battery, 158th Field Artillery. It had been originally organized at Hugo, but in 1935 was disbanded and moved to Duncan. The unit is only three years old, yet the record it has made in this short length of time would be difficult to surpass.

F Battery 1- 75mm Gun Section 1938

F Battery 1- 75mm Gun Section 1938

F Battery 2- Drivers and Trucks 1938

F Battery 2- Drivers and Trucks 1938

F Battery 3- B. C. Section 1938

F Battery 3- B. C. Section 1938

Capt. Hugh A. Neal was the first commander, under the direction of whom a battery was formed and trained that could function with the best at the summer encampments. Other officers of the new Battery were First Lieut. John E. Weiler and Second Lieuts. Paul E. Scheefers and Herbert Von Tunglen.

F Battery 4- Signal Section 1938

F Battery 4- Signal Section 1938

F Battery 5- NonCommissioned Officers 1938

F Battery 5- NonCommissioned Officers 1938

F Battery 6- Battery Mascot 1938

F Battery 6- Battery Mascot 1938

On March 1, 1937, the Service Battery was moved to Kingfisher and Battery “F” was moved to Duncan. With but four months in which to recognize and train a firing battery before the summer encampment, every man of the organization had to put out all he could. The record made at that first camp shows the men cannot be praised too highly for their efforts. Shortly after returning from camp, Captain Neal had to move to Tulsa for business reasons. Lieutenant Weiler was then placed in command and received his promotion to Captain on December 20, 1937. The present officers of the Battery are Captain Weiler, First Lieut. Paul E. Scheefers, and Second Lieuts. Ben Parrott and Basil Shirley. Captain Weiler has just completed the three-months course at the Field Artillery School at Fort Sill.

 

Officers Battery F

 Foxtrot Battery 1

Foxtrot-Battery

Band Section (Service Battery)

158th Field Artillery Regiment

Perry, Oklahoma

158 Regimental Band- Band Formation 1938

158 Regimental Band- Band Formation 1938

158 Regimental Band- Reed and Percussion Section 1938

158 Regimental Band- Reed and Percussion Section 1938

Warrant Officer Floyd R. Laird

Floyd R. Laird

 Band Section Service Battery

 

1939 Stations of Organization per National Guard Register

1939 Official National Guard Register Front Page

 (View Extract of 1939 National Guard Register)

 

1938 Regimental Roster

COLONELS
Grover C. Wamsley Headquarters Battery
LIEUTENANT COLONELS
Edgar B. Ross Headquarters Battery
MAJORS
Parkey H. Anderson Medical Department Detachment
Clarence C. Hightower Headquarters Battery
Clarence R. Steele 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Marion D. Woodworth 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
CAPTAINS
Paul E. Anderson “B” Battery
Owen Black Headquarters Battery
William C. Cooley Headquarters Battery
Dwight U. Cochrane Service Battery
Howard R. Cress “C” Battery
Glenn Gilmour 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
George D. Hann 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Albert R. Harris “D” Battery
Sidney P. Kretlow 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Frank L. Miller Medical Department Detachment
Aubrey J. Rawlings 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Jesse R. Waltrip Medical Department Detachment
John E. Weiler “F” Battery
John C. Powell Headquarters Battery
FIRST LIEUTENANTS
Edward Q. Brengle “C” Battery
Bruce Y. Dutcher “B” Battery
Powell E. Fry Medical Department Detachment
Phillip A. Monahan Headquarters Battery
Hugh A. Neal 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Van L. Ogden 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Paul E. Scheefers “F” Battery
William L. Shamel Headquarters Battery
Wilbur S. Smith 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Martin W. Steward “D” Battery
Ernest J. Stocks 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Irving J. Strickland Service Battery
Merl R. Warren 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
SECOND LIEUTENANTS
Henry T. Ford 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Geen Gilmour 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Carl E. Hall “B” Battery
Myrl A. McCormick “C” Battery
William B. McFadyen “B” Battery
William R. Meredith Service Battery
George W. Nikkel “D” Battery
Ben C. Parrott “F” Battery
Harold D. Roads “C” Battery
Basil Shirley “F” Battery
Tarlton B. Townsend Service Battery
WARRANT OFFICERS
Floyd R. Laird Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
MASTER SERGEANTS
Albert R. Burns Service Battery
Gale D. Christy Service Battery
Earl Willhoite Headquarters Battery
FIRST SERGEANTS
Robert E. Armstead “F” Battery
Theodore F. Christy Service Battery
Perry E. Davis 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Vaughn G. Hetzler Headquarters Battery
Claude L. Hostetter 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Leroy Miller “C” Battery
Carl W. Remund “D” Battery
Roy P. Upchurch “B” Battery
TECHNICAL SERGEANTS
Edward L. McCoy Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
STAFF SERGEANTS
Morris A. Bishop Service Battery
Raymond D. Hamer Medical Department Detachment
Charles F. Haney Headquarters Battery
James E. Hodges Headquarters Battery
John E. McKinley Headquarters Battery
Donald K. Patterson 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Cleo L. Pettypool 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Orval W. Rollins 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Bill F. Sharp Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Robert Villarreal 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
SERGEANTS
Ashley Alexander Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Melvin L. Allen “D” Battery
Woodrow Avritt “D” Battery
HarryL. Boggs “C” Battery
Elbert L. Briscoe Medical Department Detachment
Guy C. Builteman Medical Department Detachment
Carl B. Cooper “D” Battery
Lloyd K. Cox 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
William T. Daniels “F” Battery
Harley A. DeVibiss “C” Battery
D. F. Dowdy 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Joseph L. Duncan “B” Battery
Richard F. Dutcher “B” Battery
William V. Eyler Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
William H. Forney Service Battery
Henry L. Grant “F” Battery
Lonzo Grant “C” Battery
George W. Gresham Service Battery
Leroy B. Hall Headquarters Battery
Edward E. Hamilton “F” Battery
David P. Johnson Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Wilfred D. Lacer “B” Battery
Theodore W. Lietzke 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Joseph D. Malone 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Noah R. Mansell “F” Battery
Howard L. Martin Headquarters Battery
Archie M. Marshall “C” Battery
John W. Marshall “F” Battery
James B. McBride “F” Battery
William J. McIntosh 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Earl E. Mercer “B” Battery
M. A. Montgomery Headquarters Battery
James T. Pitts “D” Battery
Nova C. Rogers Service Battery
Lynn E. Scott 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Lawrence Shea “C” Battery
Ellis H. Shirley “B” Battery
Virgil E. Singleton “D” Battery
Edward A. Smith “D” Battery
Rollin G. Smith “C” Battery
Weldon C. Smith “C” Battery
William F. Spence “B” Battery
Charles J. Srader 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Frank Stocks 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Herbert H. Stone “D” Battery
Harold Strub Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Troy H. Tallen “B” Battery
John G. Thomasson “B” Battery
Hardy Wade “F” Battery
Vergil O. Walkling “C” Battery
Richard L. Wallace Medical Department Detachment
Chandler F. Ward “F” Battery
Jared B. White Service Battery
Ernest P. Whitsett Headquarters Battery
Houston P. Willis Headquarters Battery
Gordon F. Wonder “D” Battery
CORPORALS
Ralph L. Abercrombie 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
ThomasP. Anderson “B” Battery
Loyd Arms Headquarters Battery
Walter L. Armstrong 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Albert W. Blake 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
George L. Butler Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Clarence C. Clark “D” Battery
Charles D. Cummings “B” Battery
Curtis Dawson Headquarters Battery
Frank W. Eby “C” Battery
Alvin C. Ewald “F” Battery
William L. Fair Headquarters Battery
Clyde G. Farber “F” Battery
Leo A. Harruff “C” Battery
Ira F. Hayes “F” Battery
Lyle H. Hunt Medical Department Detachment
Clyde Hutson 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Joseph L. Korstjens Service Battery
Wilbert G. Landrith Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Earl O. Martin Headquarters Battery
John E. Mathews 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Warren A. May “F” Battery
Harry C. McCool “D” Battery
Paul B. Menaul “F” Battery
Bernard H. Methvin “B” Battery
Elbert H. Mitchell “D” Battery
Robert T. Mobley “F” Battery
Kavanaugh L. Moreland Headquarters Battery
Shepard P. Morgan “B” Battery
Louis P. Neese Headquarters Battery
Lee Nicewander “C” Battery
Charles F. Nunn 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Joe S. Purdy “D” Battery
James P. Reid “F” Battery
Robert W. Smith “B” Battery
Allen B. Stevens 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Alvin E. Steverson “B” Battery
Jack W. Strain “D” Battery
Verdis O. Swart “C” Battery
Charles M. Terry 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Ernest W. Terry 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Eldon W. Trindle Service Battery
Gano H. Tubb “D” Battery
Ed M. Tucker “C” Battery
Leo West “C” Battery
Emory l. White Service Battery
William F. White Service Battery
Nelson E. Wiggins Headquarters Battery
Howard R. Williams 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Leonard O. Winters “C” Battery
Robert Woodruff Headquarters Battery
PRIVATE’S FIRST CLASS
Haskell C. Alexander 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
William E. Babcock “F” Battery
Ray H. Ball Medical Department Detachment
Fred W. Barr “D” Battery
Rudolph L. Barrera “B” Battery
Woodrow Barton “D” Battery
Raymond J. Beams Headquarters Battery
Dudley Bell “F” Battery
Marcel L. Bingo 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Theodore L. Bowman “F” Battery
Eldridge W. Brown “B” Battery
Leonard A. Brown 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
LeRoy R. Burke “D” Battery
James A. Burrows Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Earl E. Caves 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Wilbur F. Clayton “F” Battery
Mack L. Collier Service Battery
Harley M. Cowan 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
William W. Dearborn “C” Battery
Paul E. Deming “D” Battery
Gwyn F. Dividson “B” Battery
John W. Elliott Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Kenneth G. Fiegener “D” Battery
Harold Fisher Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Boyd W. Ford “D” Battery
Delbert C. Gambill “C” Battery
Frank Garcia “B” Battery
Warren T. Garrett “F” Battery
Edward C. Gibbs “B” Battery
Robert Gordon “C” Battery
Jack E. Hadley “D” Battery
Jesse J. Harman “B” Battery
Robert D. Harrell 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Jack Harris “D” Battery
Robert R. Hartman Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Clarence Heimer Headquarters Battery
Spencer Hendrix “B” Battery
Paul S. Hicks “C” Battery
Paul D. Hurdt “B” Battery
James Hutchens “F” Battery
Norman M. Hutchens “F” Battery
Felix H. Johnson “F” Battery
Billy M. Knight 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Charles M. Krumtum “D” Battery
Charlie B. Lane “B” Battery
Paul E. Letellier “C” Battery
GeorgeF. Lohrengel “D” Battery
Cecil W. Mackey Service Battery
Leon R. Mann Headquarters Battery
Thomas R. Martin “D” Battery
Louis A. McClary Medical Department Detachment
Jim McClellan Headquarters Battery
Daniel L. McPhail “F” Battery
James M. Meazell “F” Battery
William D. Montgomery “F” Battery
Robert S. Munger “C” Battery
Edward J. Nobbman Service Battery
Joseph H. Outler Headquarters Battery
MaxM. Pappe 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Robert A. Parke Headquarters Battery
Jodie L. Parks Headquarters Battery
Fred Peden Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Louis H. Perot “C” Battery
Anton E. Peterson Service Battery
Louis W. Pflueger Service Battery
Charles H. Pitts “D” Battery
J. Milton Plumlee Headquarters Battery
Eugene H. Pollock “F” Battery
Ira O. Rambo Medical Department Detachment
Edwin Resler 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Gus Ridley “F” Battery
William L. Riner Medical Department Detachment
Thomas H. Robbins “D” Battery
Emmett V. Robrecht “B” Battery
Robert J. Robrecht “B” Battery
Cyrus Ruff “C” Battery
John R. Russell 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Curtis J. Ryan “B” Battery
Fred W. Schomaker “C” Battery
Walter W. Schomaker “C” Battery
Leroy G. Schwabe 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Benard F. Scott Medical Department Detachment
AubreE. Sears “B” Battery
Carl H. Sebring Service Battery
Everett S. Sharp Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
MarionShireman “C” Battery
Billie Smith “C” Battery
Clifford O. Smith “B” Battery
Jack C. Smith Service Battery
Richard G. Smith “F” Battery
Verble O. Smith “B” Battery
Samuel R. Steele 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Loy M. Stickney “C” Battery
Edwin L. Stroud “D” Battery
Alpha D. Tallent “B” Battery
Peter A. Terronez “C” Battery
Edwin J. Thomas Headquarters Battery
Francis H. Tubb “D” Battery
Jake C. Turpin “F” Battery
Stanley L. West Service Battery
Grover C. Wheeler 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Vester A. Wilhelm “C” Battery
Floyd E. Williamson “D” Battery
Permon O. Wood “F” Battery
PRIVATES
Francis J. Abbott Headquarters Battery
Jerry G. Abbott “D” Battery
Hubert W. Acton “B” Battery
Silas Amos Headquarters Battery
Leonard B. Andrews “F” Battery
Ross W. Anderson Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Ralph J. Armstrong 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Roy A. Askey “D” Battery
Paul U. Avritt “D” Battery
Dave H. Babcock “F” Battery
Robert D. Baldwin Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Otis P. Ballew “C” Battery
Hilleary M. Barrett Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Joe L. Bean “F” Battery
Wayne Bean “F” Battery
William L. Bennett “F” Battery
Claude W. Bentley Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Richard W. Bingo 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Billie Bray “F” Battery
Virgil R. Brown Service Battery
Jack G. Brumley 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Homer Burkleo 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Adrin W. Burns “D” Battery
Roy R. Burns “D” Battery
David B. Burrows Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Verle W. Byars Headquarters Battery
James W. Cain “C” Battery
Warren G. Callison 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Joe H. Carpenter 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Willam A. Carr Headquarters Battery
Robert M. Caswell 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Otis D. Chlouber Service Battery
Bill W. Choate 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Woodrow W. Christian “D” Battery
Phillip S. Classon “F” Battery
Michael H. Clark “F” Battery
Gurnee A. Clayton “F” Battery
Tommie L. Clayton “D” Battery
James R. Cochran “F” Battery
William H. Cooper “B” Battery
Woodrow L. Cooper “D” Battery
Afton Dare “F” Battery
Howard O. Davenport “B” Battery
Louis L. DeNoya Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Forest B. Deming “D” Battery
Bernard A. Detterm 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Paul V. Detterman 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
C. A. Dietrich “B” Battery
James W. Dorough “D” Battery
Charles B. Dryden “B” Battery
Don C. Eby “C” Battery
Finley E. Elder 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Archie L. Fassnacht “C” Battery
Merl A. Finley “B” Battery
Robert B. Fitts “B” Battery
Robert S. Fitzgerald “F” Battery
William L. Folan “C” Battery
James J. Folks “D” Battery
Donald A. Forbes Service Battery
Henry F. Ford Medical Department Detachment
Stanley E. Forman Service Battery
Charles R. Fowler “B” Battery
Lewis E. Frances “B” Battery
John W. Franklin 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Walter Fredrickson “B” Battery
Jesse Garcia “C” Battery
Hurby C. Garrett “B” Battery
George T. Gassaway “B” Battery
Roger R. Gauger 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Sidney G. Gibson Medical Department Detachment
Rex R. Gillihan “C” Battery
Druey J. Gillihan “C” Battery
Archie M. Gilliland Headquarters Battery
J. D. Golden “B” Battery
John C. Goss “D” Battery
Willie  J. Green Headquarters Battery
Walker Gudgel Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Marvin L. Gunning “D” Battery
Monroe E. Gunning “D” Battery
Robert A. Hackett “C” Battery
Woodrow L. Hackett “C” Battery
Ora R. Hall Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Willis Hamilton “F” Battery
Lawrence L. Hansen “C” Battery
Nile T. Harris Medical Department Detachment
Tommy Harris “F” Battery
Ted Hart “D” Battery
Joseph S. Haas “F” Battery
Clifford L. Haughawout Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Jodie Headley “B” Battery
Joseph G. Hempfling “C” Battery
Albert M. Hendersen “C” Battery
Frank L. Hendersen “C” Battery
Boyd E. Hicks Headquarters Battery
Donald H. Highfill “C” Battery
Lowell C. Highfill “C” Battery
Leroy R. Hinchey Headquarters Battery
Charles E. Howard “F” Battery
Jack K. Huffman “D” Battery
Wayne O. Hughes “C” Battery
George C. Hummingbird “B” Battery
Ferrold F. Hunt Medical Department Detachment
Eugene C. Jirous “C” Battery
Lambert S. Johnson “C” Battery
Millard S. Johnson “C” Battery
Ross A. Johnson “C” Battery
Franque E. Johnston Service Battery
Frank M. Jones “C” Battery
Charles E. Kale 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Howard L. Karnes “D” Battery
Robert H. Kindt “C” Battery
Vergil C. King Headquarters Battery
Francis C. Kretchmar 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
John K. Krumtum “D” Battery
Otis Lampkin Headquarters Battery
Joe D. Landon “F” Battery
Raymond Landress “F” Battery
Estill Lawless “F” Battery
Murrell C. Lawley “D” Battery
Max R. Lawter “B” Battery
Reford M. Lemon “D” Battery
Donald E. Linville “D” Battery
Thomas J. Little “D” Battery
Byron K. Long Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Melvin D. Longhorn “B” Battery
Leon G. Lorrett Medical Department Detachment
Douglas Louis Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Clarence F. Maas Headquarters Battery
Randolph B. Maddox “D” Battery
John R. Marler “D” Battery
Hugh J. Massey “F” Battery
F. E. McAnally Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Edwin O. McClanahan “D” Battery
William McCollum “F” Battery
Clyde R. McCracken “D” Battery
Johnny H. McCullough “C” Battery
Hatch McGlachlin “B” Battery
Arthur M. McPhail “F” Battery
Billie McPhail “F” Battery
Burnice L. Menasco “B” Battery
Tom Miller “C” Battery
Vance C. Miller 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
James E. Mitchell 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
James H. Moore “F” Battery
Jesse F. Morris “B” Battery
Ted T. Moser Medical Department Detachment
Ottist M. Murdock “D” Battery
Edward E. Nally Headquarters Battery
Noel H. Neel Headquarters Battery
Pete A. Negahnquet Headquarters Battery
Glenn Ney “D” Battery
Robert B. Norton “D” Battery
Robert E. Oliver “B” Battery
Dolas E. Parson Headquarters Battery
Jack F. Payne Service Battery
James M. Payne Service Battery
Carlysle P. Pipes 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Don L. Pont “C” Battery
Joe T. Powell 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Richard M. Prickett “B” Battery
Paul O. Proctor “B” Battery
Arthur F. Pugh Headquarters Battery
James W. Purcell Medical Department Detachment
James R. Rea “D” Battery
Lloyd Richardson “F” Battery
Dayle M. Robbins “D” Battery
Roger W. Rose “B” Battery
Milo S. Ross “B” Battery
William T. Rutledge “C” Battery
Warren V. Ryan “C” Battery
Frank D. Sebring Service Battery
Harley H. Sebring Service Battery
Dick T. Senft Medical Department Detachment
Lonnie A. Shaffer Headquarters Battery
Vincent B. Shaffer “B” Battery
William F. Shanklin “D” Battery
William T. Shears “B” Battery
Quanah P. Shelton 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Cecil H. Sheppard “F” Battery
Ralph E. Shireman “C” Battery
Jennings A. Shires “F” Battery
Claude R. Shirley “B” Battery
Francis H. Spradlin “C” Battery
John L. Stanley “F” Battery
Hugh E. St. Clair “C” Battery
A. E. Streight “F” Battery
Lloyd E. Stephens Headquarters Battery
David G. Stevens 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
William W. Stockton 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Harold W. Stone Service Battery
Melvin G. Sturgis 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Scott F. Suffdy Headquarters Battery
Steve C. Sweeney “D” Battery
Jimmie B. Taliaferro “F” Battery
Stephen Terronez “C” Battery
Don Tharp Service Battery
Hawley D. Tharp Service Battery
Edwin B. Thorne Medical Department Detachment
Donald K. Tice Service Battery
Joe D. Ticer Medical Department Detachment
John L. Treeman “C” Battery
O.K. J. Tuttle “C” Battery
Marion W. Utley Service Battery
Floyd Villarreal 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Don J. Vinson Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
L. A. Walker “F” Battery
Leonard W. Walter Service Battery
Bobby K. Watson “F” Battery
Leo F. Weaver “B” Battery
Hewitt J. West Service Battery
Raymond E. West Headquarters Battery
Lonzo H. Wharton “F” Battery
Richard G. Wiggins Headquarters Battery
Aurey A. Williams 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Abel A. Williamson Headquarters Battery
Edmond Williamson Headquarters Battery
Ralph W. Withrow 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Willis L. Wojahn 2nd Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Hartwell E. Wolgram “B” Battery
Wendell E. Wood Regimental Band  (Service Battery)
Clifford L. Wright 1st Battalion Headquarters Battery & Combat Train
Henry E. Wynne Headquarters Battery
Warren H. Young “B” Battery
Ray A. Young “B” Battery
Roy O. Young “B” Battery